Dreaming, you glide

 

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Light reflecting on a wall in Adelaide

 

Posts on soundslikenoise will be a little sporadic while I complete compositions for a number of upcoming exhibitions.

Dreaming, you glide is a work in progress, to be listened to in an exhibition featuring sculpture and sound.

Thalamus

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Thalamus, the part of the brain that transmits sensory information and regulates consciousness, was originally designed for a piece in an upcoming sculpture exhibition.

After working on the sound for quite some time I decided it would overwhelm the viewing experience. Rather than discarding it Thalamus has found a new life here on soundslikenoise.

Flinders Ranges – a trip into South Australia

Flinders New Year

I swore there would be no field-recording during the much treasured summer holidays. This would be a time to rebalance the senses, to enjoy the outdoors without microphones and recorders. For the most part this resolution was maintained, helped in no small way by strong winds and temperatures of 40 degrees.

But there were some key sounds that couldn’t be left undocumented. Dry plants swaying in the relentless wind …

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On New Years Eve we climbed a hill adjacent to our cabin to watch the final sunset of 2015. It couldn’t have been more perfect. As a rainbow stretched from one range to another the sky started turning into various shades of blue to indigo to violet.

The sky, the ranges, the plains … colours enough to startle my jaded self into a renewed sense of wonder, an appreciation of the ephemeral. The wind tore through the trees.

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The following morning we walked into a small section of this range. Here we were told Indigenous rock paintings telling the story of the formation of the ranges could be found.

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It was early in the morning but the heat radiating from the rocks was already intense. The unfamiliar terrain kept us walking.

Flinders rock painting

 

Finally we came upon the ancient paintings, the sunlight reflecting off the rocks. The weight of its history and significance kept us there, we looked at the contours, the colours and motifs, but couldn’t decode its narrative.

A wire grill protected the paintings from human interference. I attached microphones to it and recorded the wind passing over the wires. A sound imposing a cinematic effect upon the location.

Flinders eagle

Eagles and hawks dominated the sky.

Flinders wallabies

Kangaroos and wallabies watched us wherever we went

Flinders Canyon

A canyon in another part of the ranges contains another set of visible reminders of the first Australians.

Flinders rock carving

Carvings in the stones signify pools of water that can be found in this arid region, others signify emu footprints. Here the sound of flies dominated the small space. I regretted leaving the microphone behind that day.

Flinders last day

 

The first sunset of 2016 was quite unlike the evening before. A brilliant gold swept across the valley. Wind and flies welcomed the new year.

Adelaide

A 5-hour drive south brought us to Adelaide. We sat on the street and saw a man walk into a tree branch. He cursed loudly before tearing it to the ground. Days later David Bowie died.

Auditory Visions: Shitehawk by Rona Green

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Shitehawk by Rona Green

 

Rona Green is well known for her hand coloured linocuts of hybrid figures. Shitehawk exemplifies her interest in the hyper-masculinised world of men living on society’s edge. In this portrait Shitehawk is about to engage in a street fight where there can be only one winner.

Green’s larger than life figure required extreme sounds to amplify this narrative. Field recordings of a chaotic urban world merge with processed sounds to represent the scene that is being played out.

This is the final post relating to the Auditory Visions exhibition. Time for a much needed break over the holiday period. Thanks for your visits and comments this year. Till 2016 …

Auditory Visions: Threnody by G.W. Bot

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Threnody by G.W. Bot (1993)

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Threnody, a song of mourning, looks down upon a snowy landscape where stark trees break through a white surface. Named, in part, as a tribute to Peter Sculthorpe’s composition of the same title, the dominant sound for this work is a cello progressing in slow harmonic intervals. My aim was to acknowledge the musical connection identified by Bot whilst capturing the steady mood of her print.

This work was included in Auditory Visions, an exhibition of prints and sound created by myself and Rona Green. G.W. Bot is one of Australia’s most prominent printmakers. It was an honour to have her work included in the exhibition.

To learn more about the exhibition, and to view all of the works, please visit the Auditory Visions website.

Auditory Visions: Ascension II by Alexi Keywan

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Ascension II by Alexi Keywan

 

The work of Alexi Keywan can be identified through her etched silhouettes of quotidian urban scenes. This is shown to a powerful effect in her Ascension series with towers rising above the horizon dominating the landscape. Pinholes mark the paper, almost signifying the perimeter of the towers’ sonic territory.

For Ascension II I wanted to adjust the viewer’s sense of spatial perspective by using recordings of electrical activity that would draw attention down upon the township overseen by the tower. Here sound acts to divert the focus away from the main image to details that might otherwise have been overlooked at a cursory glance.

The entire Auditory Visions collection is now online. Please follow the link to view the works. If you are in the local area please drop in to the Lismore Regional Gallery, NSW before October 24th.

Auditory Visions: Atmosphere II by Michael Schlitz

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Atmosphere II by Michael Schlitz

 

Living in his Tasmanian bushland home Michael Schlitz is closer to nature than most. As a result Schlitz’s work depicts abstracted trees, landscapes and representations of the elements. The 5 prints which comprise the Atmosphere series continues this practice with each work illustrating the different patterns of weather that envelope and affect us.

Schlitz’s striking woodblock prints are at once alien yet recognisable. Fine black lines cut through the air in a tempestuous yet balanced manner. Atmosphere II depicts snow drifting and swirling on its descent to earth. It is a quiet scene which needed to be reflected in its auditory companion piece.  I used a field recording of snow dropping on fallen dried leaves (from my Estonian residency) to form the central feature in the composition. Subtle tones fade in and out, moving with the wind, in an attempt to position the viewer high in the atmosphere in a place of solitude or isolation.

Auditory Visions continues till October 24th at Lismore Regional Gallery. For those of you who aren’t in the local area please visit the Auditory Visions website to access the prints and sounds from this exhibition.