Tag Archives: froglets

First Day of Spring, 2011.



The 1st of September marks the beginning of Spring in Australia. Unlike most countries the change of seasons in Australia is signalled by the beginning of a calendar month rather than the position of the earth to the sun.

After months of near silence the valley is now full with the sound of Spring in action. This was no better exemplified by 2 walks through a neighbouring wetland.

By day a chorus of tiny green froglets surrounded the area in the photograph. Their sharp cricks cutting through the air at a volume that far exceeds their body size. It has been said that this mass use of vocalisation by animals such as frogs and crickets is used as a defensive mechanism against predators. Whatever its function may be, the area was all the richer for it.

By night the wetland was deafening. Several other species of frogs spent hours communicating to each other at top volume in the safety of the darkness; a huge contrast from the silence that pervaded the area the week before.

The debate as to whether spring should really commence at the beginning of a calendar month seemed irrelevant in the face of the life in the swamp.

Before Dawn – 1’14”


Waking an hour before dawn it seemed a good idea to record the sounds of nocturnal wildlife in the adjacent forest. A colony of froglets living alongside a mountain stream takes centre stage in this clip, their early morning voices being accompanied by a few birds and the ever-present drips of dew falling from the trees above. The stillness of this soundscape continued for almost an hour until it was overwhelmed by the sounds of dawn.

Bats: Twilight – 1’23”


Returning to the same wetland hours later the bats have begun to fly away from the forest in search of fruit and nectar. In their place the steady “pop” of the local frogs creates a soothing new ambience, contrasting the acoustic madness from hours earlier. In the background the rumble of the ocean can be heard. It’s encouraging to note that all of this takes place within a short walk from the centre of town.